Effects of mode and timing of calcium chloride application on tissue calcium concentration and acceptability of mango fruits

Effects of mode and timing of calcium chloride application on tissue calcium concentration and acceptability of mango fruits

Author: 
Bitange, Naphis Mokaya
Publisher: 
Rural Outreach Programme (ROP)
Date published: 
2021
Record type: 
Region: 
Responsibility: 
Chemining?wa, GN, jt. author
Ambuko, JL, jt. author
Owino, WO, jt. author
Journal Title: 
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development
Source: 
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development, Vol 21, No. 8, September 2021, pp. 18552-18573
Abstract: 

Mango (Mangifera indica L) production in Kenya directly supports approximately 200,000 farmers and many other beneficiaries. Despite this, its production suffers from post-harvest losses due to the fruits' short shelf life in ambient conditions. Calcium maintains cell integrity, strengthens the cell wall, membrane structure, and thus increases shelf life. A completely randomized block design with a split plot arrangement was used to compare the effect of spraying and immersion of 'Van Dyke' mango fruits at maturity or 15 days later in calcium chloride at different concentrations (0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, or 0%) and times on the fruit ripening rate and organoleptic acceptance. The peel firmness (N), total soluble solids (0Brix), flesh color (Ho), beta carotene (mg/100ml), and carbon dioxide evolution (ml/kg/hr) of fruits were determined at time 0 and every two days for up to eight days in ambient conditions. Additionally, organoleptic characteristics, flesh firmness, calcium concentration (g/mg), and their correlations were determined. Fruits immersed in calcium chloride at maturity had higher retained peel firmness (10.6 N, 10.3 N), deeper flesh color (37.45, 36.78), lower total soluble solids (14, 13.8), a lower carbon dioxide evolution (30.7 ml/kg/hr), higher beta carotene and higher flesh calcium concentration than fruits exposed to other treatments. Fruits sprayed at maturity outperformed those sprayed 15 days later in the studied parameters. Flesh calcium content correlated positively with flesh firmness (r= 0.913, r= 0.852), flesh color (r= 0.828, r= 0.841), fruit aroma (r=0.8199, r=0.841), and negatively with skin shriveling (r=-0.778, r=-0.806) and fruit flavor (r=-0.811, r=-0.829). Flesh firmness correlated negatively with skin shriveling (r=-0.868, r=-0.788) and fruit flavor (r=-0.8869, r=-0.821), but positively with peel color (r=0.9115, r=0.856) and aroma (r=0.907, r=0.848). Skin shriveling was found to have a negative relationship with peel color (r=-0.944, r=-0.93) and aroma (r=-0.944, r=-0.938), but a positive relationship with fruit flavor (r=0.933, r=0.947). Peel color correlated positively with aroma (r=0.979, r=0.977) and negatively with fruit flavor (r=-0.962, r=-0.950), respectively. Despite the effectiveness of post-harvest calcium chloride immersion in extending fruit shelf life, optimal use is advised to avoid deteriorated pulp flavor and increased shriveling. More research is needed to determine how calcium chloride can be made available to the fruit while it is still attached to the tree.

Language: 

CITATION: Bitange, Naphis Mokaya. Effects of mode and timing of calcium chloride application on tissue calcium concentration and acceptability of mango fruits . : Rural Outreach Programme (ROP) , 2021. African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development, Vol 21, No. 8, September 2021, pp. 18552-18573 - Available at: http://library.au.int/effects-mode-and-timing-calcium-chloride-application-tissue-calcium-concentration-and-acceptability