Management - Leadership

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 59-60
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Gregersen, Hal
Abstract: 

Although CEOs are charged with recognizing when their firms need a major change in direction, their power and privilege often insulate them from information that would help them perceive looming opportunities or threats. No one in the company wants to tell the CEO of problems, much less that he or she is mistaken.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 2, March-April 2017, pp. 76-83
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Wedell-Wedellsborg, Thomas
Abstract: 

In surveys of 106 C-suite executives representing 91 private- and public-sector companies from 17 countries, the author found that a full 85% agreed that their organizations were bad at problem diagnosis, and 87% agreed that this flaw carried significant costs. Fewer than one in 10 said they were unaffected by the issue.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 1, January-February 2017, pp. 76-83
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Mocker, Martin
Abstract: 

If product innovation is not managed, the growing operational complexity creates problems for both customers and employees, and has a negative impact on a firm's bottom line. The article identifies three solutions to this problem. First, focus on product integration rather than proliferation.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 3, May-June 2017, pp. 104-111
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Kohavi, Ron
Abstract: 

The authors posit that too many firms rely on subjective opinions when making key decisions, from marketing campaigns to new product features, and therefore place large investments at risk. They emphasize the importance of using A-B testing to shift decision making to hard data.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 74-81
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Morse, Gardiner
Abstract: 

Guido Jouret, chief digital officer at Swiss industrial firm ABB AG, notes that augmented reality helps address three key challenges: dangerous jobs, operations in remote locations, and highly complex procedures or tasks.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 60-62
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Butler, Timothy
Abstract: 

Aspiring to be innovative and agile, today companies of all shapes and sizes want to recruit entrepreneurial managers. But most firms lack a scientific way to separate the true entrepreneurs from other candidates.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 2, March-April 2017, pp. 84-93
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Zak, Paul J.
Abstract: 

Managers have tried various strategies and perks to boost employee engagement--all with little impact on long-term retention and performance. But now, neuroscience offers some answers.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 1, January-February 2017, pp. 84-90
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
DalleMule, Leandro
Abstract: 

The authors recommend a data management strategy that is both defensive (such as governance and security) and offensive (such as prediction analytics). Key elements of the defensive approach include ensuring data quality and security, with core activities involving optimizing data standardization, extraction, access, and storage.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 3, May-June 2017, pp. 112-122
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Iansiti, Marco
Abstract: 

The article examines the dominance of hub firms - digital superpowers that are capturing a growing and disproportionate share of the global economy's value. This dominance has the potential to deepen income inequality and destabilize society.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 84-92
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017